Brief bio

Long walks out on the South Downs with my dog - not a bad way to grow up. 

Long walks out on the South Downs with my dog - not a bad way to grow up. 

My passion for wildlife and natural history began while I was growing up on farms in the beautiful Sussex countryside. I spent most of my time outdoors getting muddy and learning about the world around me from my father. 

I was fortunate enough to have a family that encouraged and fostered my (many) interests. Frequent trips to London's Natural History Museum and Brighton's Booth Museum cemented my love of natural history. Family holidays were typically spent exploring Britain's coastline, which usually meant coming home with a boot load of fossils and other rock samples! 

I eventually went to the University of Southampton to read Geology with Marine Biology, graduating in 2011. While there, I learnt that my skills were best suited to the communication of science rather than studying it, and I began honing these skills. This included representing the university at the Lyme Regis Fossil Festival (where I continue to volunteer), working with the Discover Oceanography programme and starting my own business running interactive science workshops for home educated students.  

Can't beat a giant ammonite. 

Can't beat a giant ammonite. 

I sort of realised there's probably a bit more to life outside of the southeast corner of England, so upon graduating I disappeared off to South India for three years where I worked as a geography and science teacher. It's a spectacular cliché to say that you go to India to 'find yourself', but in many respects it confirmed in me what I wanted to get from life. I developed a real passion for the country, its culture, its people and its languages, and had a genuinely wonderful three years.  

After conquering Thorung La - the highest point on the Annapurna Circuit in Nepal at 5,416m. Among the most incredible places I have ever been! 

After conquering Thorung La - the highest point on the Annapurna Circuit in Nepal at 5,416m. Among the most incredible places I have ever been! 

Since returning to the UK in 2014 I have worked a variety of jobs, starting with field ecology as a reptile specialist before starting work at the Institute of Physics Publishing as a production editor. I later went freelance as a writer, presenter and editor while studying for a master's degree in Science Communication at Imperial College, London. 

I now work for the Geological Society where I am the special publications editor, and I continue to work freelance as a science writer and presenter, gradually expanding into podcasting and other forms of broadcast media. I'm constantly looking to improve my skills and always on the lookout for new opportunities that come my.